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Oregon Court of Appeals might see electioneering case soon

| Aug 8, 2014 | Civil Appeals |

The Oregon Court of Appeals might soon be hearing the case of a man who is facing a $75 fine for electioneering. The man who received the fine is the Albany City Manager, but he claims to have done nothing wrong.

He is facing the fine for failing to put the cost to individual taxpayers on a press release he wrote in 2013. According to the Oregon Secretary of State’s Office, the man should have put the amount per taxpayer based on each $1,000 of the assessed value of property on the press release. That press release had to do with the $20.3 million bond election for fire and police facilities, which failed in the election.

The Albany City Manager, who is being represented for free by the City Attorney, has 60 days starting from Aug. 4 to appeal the decision by the Elections Division. That decision came after the man had appealed his case to Judge Alison Greene Webster, who also sided with the Secretary of State’s Office, and then appealed the decision she made regarding his case.

Having to sort through election laws and some other laws can be rather complex undertakings. Ensuring that you are interpreting them in the intended manner helps to make sure that you are doing things in a legal fashion. In some cases, the way you interpret things might not be the way they were intended or the way others interpret them. Knowing what legal recourse, such as civil litigation, you have in those instances can help you determine your steps.

Source: Corvallis Gazette-Times, “Albany city manager still faces fine; case to go to Court of Appeals” Steve Lundeberg, Aug. 06, 2014