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What kind of training on sexual harassment do managers need?

| Oct 7, 2015 | Civil Litigation |

Over the past few weeks, we have discussed how employers should respond to complaints about sexual harassment. In most cases, it is easier for an employer to make it clear from the beginning that sexual harassment isn’t permissible. One way that employers can do this is to provide training for managers to help them learn about sexual harassment and how to prevent sexual harassment.

What should a training program for managers include?

A training program for managers should discuss quid pro quo sexual harassment, recognizing the signs of sexual harassment, signs of a hostile work environment, how to accept a sexual harassment complaint and how to counsel employees. Even if the manager isn’t expected to fulfill every role surrounding a sexual harassment complaint, the managers should still have a basic understanding of all aspects of sexual harassment.

How often should employers provide training?

While the frequency of training is something that an employer can decide, it is necessary for all managers to have a basic understanding about sexual harassment. Discussing sexual harassment, the effects of sexual harassment and the possible penalties that employees face if they sexually harass other employees is necessary. It is recommended that employers let all employees know that there is a strong disapproval for sexual harassment in all forms in the workplace.

When an employee makes a complaint about sexual harassment, your actions can have a profound impact on your company. This is true even if the person who was harassing an employee is a vendor, client or another third party. Make sure that you and your management team are prepared to deal with all sexual harassment complaints that might come up, even ones that might require legal attention.

Source: Media-Partners.com, “Sexual Harassment Made Simple for Managers,” accessed Oct. 07, 2015